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Airlines and the Fallout from COVID 19: What Aircrafts are No Longer in Service

Airlines and the Fallout from COVID 19: What Aircrafts are No Longer in Service

It is not surprising that airlines are suffering from the COVID-19 pandemic, because not too many people are traveling. What may surprise people though is that some airlines have retired certain aircrafts permanently. While we do not know what this will mean for future flights, we can share which aircrafts have been grounded permanently.

What Aircrafts are No Longer in Service After the COVID-19 Pandemic

COVID 19 Fallout

Delta Airlines

Delta Airlines was not supposed to retire its MD-88s and MD-90s until a much later date, but they are now exiting by the beginning of June. By the end of this year, all their Boeing 777-200s, of which there are eighteen of, will be retired. This is how big the Covid 19 fallout.

Delta Air Lines McDonnell Douglas MD-88 was taking off from Detroit Metropolitan Airport.
Delta Air Lines McDonnell Douglas MD-88 was taking off from Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

American Airlines

American Airlines was planning on retiring many different aircrafts by the end of this year, but they are moving up their timeline now. The aircrafts they are retiring include all their Embraer E190s, Boeing 757s, Boeing 767s, Airbus 330-300s, and Bombardier CRJ200s.

American Airlines Boeing 757 passing over Maho Beach
American Airlines Boeing 757 passing over Maho Beach with tourists posing for photos enjoying vacations. Airplane registered N200UU on final approach.

Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines will be retiring all their B777-200/ER aircrafts. While some of them are in Alice Springs, NT, Australia right now, they will be moved to their final destination once it is safe.

Austrian Airlines

Austrian Airlines is starting to retire some of its fleet. They are starting with all their A319s, as well as three of the six of their B767-300s. In 2022, the rest of this airline’s Dash 8 fleet will be retired.

Air Transat

Air Transat was not supposed to retire its last A310 until its last scheduled flight at the end of April. However, COVID-19 wreaked havoc on those plans and caused this airline to retire it early.

Air Canada

Air Canada is currently retiring seventy-nine of its aircraft. The retired aircrafts include Boeing 767s, Airbus 319s, and the Embraer 190s.

Covid 19 fallout on Air Canada
Air Canada Boeing 767-375 (ER) takes off from Schiphol Airport.

IAG Group

The IAG Group will be focusing on the possibility of retiring their BA B747s and their A340s early. No final decision has been made, but the prospects of keeping them up in the air are slim.

British Airways Boeing 747-400 airplane London Heathrow airport (LHR) OneWorld special livery in the United Kingdom.
British Airways Boeing 747-400 airplane London Heathrow airport (LHR) OneWorld special livery in the United Kingdom.

Virgin Atlantic

Virgin Atlantic Airlines recently announced that they will be retiring all their B747-400s and A330-200s. They also retired their last A340-600 at the end of March.

Air France

The A380s of Air France are no longer in service. These aircraft have been slowly retired since the beginning of January, but the speed has been ramping up with the current circumstances.

This Airbus A380-861 type code A388 is Operation by Air France. The registration number is F-HPJG. Take off from Paris (Charles de Gaulle Airport).
This Airbus A380-861 type code A388 is Operation by Air France. The registration number is F-HPJG. Take off from Paris (Charles de Gaulle Airport).

KLM

KLM recently retired all their Boeing 747-400s, which was a year earlier than planned. There are still three of these aircraft in flight, but they are only being used to transport cargo over to Shanghai.

A KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Boeing 747-400 taking off on April 21, 2015 in Amsterdam. KLM is the largest airline of the Netherlands with its hub at Amsterdam airport.
A KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Boeing 747-400 taking off on April 21, 2015 in Amsterdam. KLM is the largest airline of the Netherlands with its hub at Amsterdam airport.

Lufthansa

Lufthansa is planning to use less aircraft in the near future and that is why they have been retiring many different aircrafts. Their Airbus A320s are being phased out, as are some of their Airbus A380s, Boeing 747-400s, and Airbus 340-300s. Some of these may end up returning in the future, but for now they are listed on the retired list.

There will be fewer aircraft in the sky once travel fully resumes after COVID-19 and it is unknown how long that will be the case. However, we do know that these aircrafts will be retired, and that new aircraft will be needed if, and when, these airlines determine they need more planes in the sky.

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